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Primal Endurance Podcast

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.
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Mar 21, 2017

Brad Kearns honors Tupac with a long serving of memorized rap lyrics and then talks about going keto. Maffetone suggests you restrict more carbs as you age, since we become more insulin resistant as we get older. Brad discusses his first effort at nutritional ketosis, which lasted only 3 weeks until he bombed out and had a week-long bout of fatigue. This was likely due to a prolonged fight or flight response making glucose to fuel energy since he was not fully fat- and keto-adapted, but had restricted carbs from historical patterns. Dr. D’Agostino says many people bomb out after three weeks because this is the toughest period to adapt, but the full benefits have not kicked in yet. Brad then relates how his second foray into keto, 126 days and counting at the time of recording, has been much more successful.

Mar 17, 2017

Host Brad Kearns goes back to the mailbag with some great Q&A submissions. Can I do strength training during the aerobic base building phase? What if my endurance goals are not competitive, but rather to have fun and get some thrills on a mountain bike (even if this means elevated heart rates?)? How do you reconcile the Primal Blueprint fitness approach of move frequently, lift heavy things, and sprint, with the Primal Endurance approach of periodization?

Brian asks how to tell if chronic cardio problems are due to diet or exercise? [00:00:28] 

If I go a long time without doing the strength work while I am training for high intensity, won't I lose some of my strength? [00:06:25] 

Can I train exclusively Maff plus strength training and count my races for anaerobic training? [00:16:03] 

Can you mix anaerobic with aerobic in the same session? [00:23:24] 

Are longer single aerobic sessions more effective than the same volume of multiple workouts in a week? [00:23:23] 

I've been using the Maff method of aerobic heart rate monitoring and was wondering when I should alter the "180 minus your age" as I get older. [00:25:32] 

From Blake: I want to balance health and fun in getting in as much mountain biking as possible which would mean I am going over my aerobic heart rate. What do you think? [00:27:26]

Mar 14, 2017

Brad Kearns warms up his voice with Tupac and then covers a topic that hasn’t been mentioned much - how to taper for a peak competitive event. Here’s what NOT to do: don’t training chronically for weeks on end and then crash on the couch for the final couple weeks before the event. Instead, pretend the race is a week earlier than actual and be chomping at the bit as the clock counts down. Maintain intensity, high blood volume, and an active lifestyle, but dramatically cut back on volume - you don’t need a 20-mile run two weeks before your marathon because it takes two weeks to recover from a 20-mile run! For diet, you best be eating optimally at all times instead of pondering some magic regimen to give you a competition boost. Finally, get over yourself and the importance of your event so you don’t waste mental energy stressing. 

Mar 10, 2017

Host Brad Kearns connects with Peter Defty, promoter of Optimized Fat Metabolism and Vespa energy food: Vespapower.com. Peter is a very early promoter of fat adapted training, and is a successful ultra distance athlete, with many marathons and a Western States 100-mile Endurance Run finish. Since the early 2000s, Peter has coached other athletes to optimize their fat metabolism, including some world-class performers like Zach Bitter, Nell Stephenson, and many others. 

This is a lively show with an analysis of some contentious issues in the current fat adapted training scene. Defty is promoting a “MMAF” - Modified Maximum Aerobic Function. Basically, the idea is that fat adapted athletes can increase their aerobic training heart rate by some 20 beats, because of their optimized fat metabolism and improved cardiovascular system function. This is a pretty big deal because MAF is being promoted as the end-all for aerobic conditioning. 

Defty suggests that fat-adapted training improves cardiovascular function to the extent that athletes might even see an increase in maximum heart rate. This is some provocative stuff that will be interesting food for thought for endurance athletes out there who are dedicated to aerobic training and fat-adapted eating.

Who is Peter Defty and what is his Optimized Fat Metabolism and Vespa food promotion? [00:00:40] 

Do carbs have a place in this endurance world? [00:05:56] 

Using the Vespa supplement in races has what effect? [00:08:46] 

People are meant to be fat burners so what happened when the carbs came into the mix? [00:11:08] 

What is Modified Maximum Aerobic Function? [00:14:23] 

When we look at the some of the greatest athletes in the past and know that their diets were different, what happened to their hearts that they were able to perform like they did? [00:20:42] 

If you are fat-adapted and you are getting better performance from your cardio-vascular system does it increase your maximum heartbeat? [00:25:19] 

What about the idea of bumping up your heart rate increasing the stress level of training? [00:29:00]

Isn't it confusing to think that the diet can increase the heart rate? [00:34:19] 

What are the strength athletes getting from this high fat diet? [00:37:54] 

How does insulin come into play? [00:42:41] 

What is a strategic inclusion of carbohydrates into the diet to optimize performance? [00:46:05] 

 

Mar 7, 2017

Brad Kearns raps with Ludacris and Bieber and then discusses concepts relating to maximum aerobic heart rate and how to escape carb dependency and become a fat burning beast. Brad reflects on Peter Defty’s recent appearance on the show and his suggestion of increasing your maximum aerobic heart rate if you are fat adapted; how Dr. Phil Maffetone reminds us that even slow paced aerobic workouts support peak performance at all speeds; and his propensity during his professional triathlon career to train very slowly in order to moderate the overall training program stress, but still support peak endurance performance in races. Bottom line: Slow down, eat primal-style, make your easy workouts easier and occasionally hit it really hard with what Mark Sisson calls, “Breakthrough workouts.”

Mar 3, 2017

Host Brad Kearns welcomes Andrew to the hot seat as they tackle more Q&A sessions. Topics include: how quickly one can improve when slowing way down to stay aerobic, using perceived exertion in anaerobic type races like mountain biking, how to best consume calories during sustained workouts (including fine-tuning fat adaptation by consuming minimal amounts) and how the “cheat day” mentality is totally ridiculous.

 

42 year old firefighter asks about how much improvement should he expect in months or a year after I have switched to the slower method of training? And what about the pace in an upcoming race? [00:00:53] 

As a firefighter, I am obligated to stay strong in the gym lifting weights. How will affect my racing? [00:05:51] 

The next question is about training partners who keep a faster pace. At what point do I know to shift my focus to a more intense workout? [00:06:51] 

A mountain bike racer is asking will the fat adapted approach still provide enough glycogen for all the anaerobic work? [00:08:19] 

Do I keep the commitment to aerobic as I enter the racing season? [00:12:27] 

Will a No Sugar Branched-Chain Amino Acid drink mess with my attempt to stay fat adapted? [00:14:54] 

Should I eat to build volume during the base building period? [00:15:54] 

How much is too much when we are talking about training at these aerobic heart rates? Should I use HRV to per iodize my schedule? [00:16:56] 

How should I use these starch products and high quality carb sources for fueling during training and racing? [00:22:28] 

What about cardiac drift that comes when you get really fatigued? [00:33:28] 

How long a drift above maximum aerobic heart rate does it take to negate the training session? [00:36:12]

Feb 28, 2017

Host Brad Kearns talks about the various options for how to use keto as a long-term tool for metabolic optimization. Long term nutritional ketosis is recommended by oracles like Dr. Phil Maffetone and could be a good option for many. Cyclic ketosis is a reasonable choice, where you enjoy the benefits of fasting/keto-aligned meals and also enjoy higher carb meals that bump you temporarily out of ketosis but help you recover from exercise stress and enjoy life and you can stay in a primal-aligned mode and not bother with the regimentation and strictness of nutritional ketosis, and still enjoy assorted health benefits.

Feb 24, 2017

The popular Q&A shows have a new twist and Andrew MacNaughton, former elite pro, The Athletes Potential coach, and popular podcast repeat guest, tackles questions from listeners. Some of the questions lead us to hitting some big picture philosophical points hard. Andrew urges athletes to ignore the struggle and suffer mentality that is embedded in endurance culture. You don’t have to suffer or feel routinely tired to progress as an athlete.

 

Focus on going faster at aerobic heart rates rather than inching up training heart rates. There are assorted dangers of training in the black hole. Furthermore, you implement and refine good technique at slow speeds (true in all sports). You can mix in a bit of strength training during aerobic periods, especially if you have goals like obstacle course racing. 

 

Is there a propensity to over train? [00:01:09] 

 

In order to feel good about being in shape should workouts and training be a painful punishment? [00:05:22] 

 

Should we have "make-up workouts?" [00:06:40] 

 

Alicia asks what kind of heart monitor should she use? [00:09:46] 

 

Is it a good goal to try to bump up our heart rates? [00:11:25] 

 

What is the right level to shoot for in order to train BELOW my Maximum Aerobic Function? [00:15:05] 

 

Is it important to do "quality" rather than "junk miles"? [00:19:44] 

 

Can one apply this theory of going slow in training in swimming or golfing? [00:24:00] 

 

What are some techniques one should use for preparing for Obstacle Course Racing? [00:29:57] 

Feb 21, 2017
Host Brad Kearns nears the end of the long series of interval shows on diet, with discussion about going keto in this show and the next. In particular, this show covers the importance of doing the proper groundwork to prepare for a successful foray into nutritional ketosis, and understanding (per Dr. Dom D'Agostino) that you really should commit to 6 weeks minimum of strict adherence to nutritional ketosis guidelines. It takes that long for the benefits to really kick in and your muscles to stop competing with your brain for ketones when glucose is restricted. To do it right, you must limit carb intake to 50 gross grams per day, and also make sure to limit protein intake to the minimum necessary to ensure lean muscle mass maintenance and no more. This can be as low as 0.5 grams per pound of lean mass up to 0.8 grams per pound of lean mass - not much. 
Feb 17, 2017

Brock Armstrong on protein, strength training, losing body fat, and self-testing 

Host Brad Kearns welcomes popular recurring guest Brock Armstrong for a wide-ranging discussion, including: latest trends in ancestral health, why the protein fad is missing the boat, and how lowering protein might improve both health and peak performance (hint: shouldn't be using protein as fuel, even when you are trying to increase muscle mass); Brock's transition to serious strength training: he works hard in the gym for 45 min, Brad for only 15 min. But this could be a function of their neurotransmitter composition and optimizing workout types and workout patterns accordingly (listen to Dave Dollé show #47 for more detail on this important, but little-discussed topic). Brock's shocking DEXA scan results showing he had osteoporosis and also an elevated body fat number that calls into question all other less-precise methods as being perhaps inaccurate. The pair discuss the pros and cons of self-testing. Yes, it's important to get regular checkups and screens, address all health concerns, take advantage of online customized blood testing, and even look toward alternative healers for peak performance goals. But overdoing it and getting OCD about it can become stressful in and of itself. Reference Andrew MacNaughton's oft-discussed mantra of making training decisions according to moods, and always factor intuition into your health and training picture. Enjoy this lively and fast-moving discussion that will definitely get you thinking, especially about stuff you should test and track and other stuff you might not want to worry too much about!

 

Are we in the ancestral movement eating too much protein? [00:01:20] 

What is happening when you are taking in more protein than you need and ballooning up? [00:06:32] 

How does one optimize the diet to get the balance with desired body composition? [00:11:25] 

How does one know how much time one needs for a workout? Is it a genetic contribution? [00:13:51] 

What does one learn about fitness when measuring body fat? [00:22:26] 

What surprising results happened with Brock's bone density exam? [00:31:09] 

What does the regular person look for when they go to their family physician about their overall health? [00:35:30] 

Do we really need all the technology (apps, scans, etc.) to maintain our body health? [00:44:05] 

SOME FUNNIES:

String challenge: Put string around waist. If the distance is less than half of your height, you are "healthy."[00:52:54] 

The collarbone challenge: Take a roll of quarters and place them in the space of your collarbone. If they stay put, you are efficiently skinny. [00:53:43] 

Brock Armstrong

DEXA Scan

Feb 14, 2017

Time to leverage the information from the previous shows and try out a ketogenic eating period! First, be sure you are highly fat adapted, ideally with months under your belt of primal aligned eating. In particular, you want a virtual elimination of grains, sugars and refined vegetable oils, and definitely an average daily carb intake under the Primal Blueprint standard of 150 grams of carbs per day or less. Make a minimum 6-week commitment to going keto, where you will limit carb intake to 50 grams per day or less, and limit protein intake to a range of 0.5 to 1 gram per pound (1.1 to 2.2 grams per kilo) of lean body mass. Essentially, your macronutrient profile will be high/very high fat, low/moderate protein and very low carb. 

Avoid chronic training patterns and overly stressful lifestyle behaviors that will tip your ship in the direction of carb dependency. Consider using supplements like Kegenix, KetoCaNa, Pruvit, etc. to turbo-charge your ketone burning and perhaps get you over humps like energy lulls and you recalibrate your metabolic machinery in the direction of ketone burning. 

Feb 10, 2017

Host Brad Kearns catches up with an old-time triathlon legend Michael Collins. Based in Irvine, CA, Michael is one of the leading triathlon swim and performance coaches in the country, and was a former pro competitor back in the late 80s and early 90s. He has been competing in assorted endurance and multi-sport events non-stop for 30 years. Michael has a casual approach to training that has fueled his longevity and offers a valuable model for all endurance athletes. He calls himself a "Lazy trainer," who is "always a couple weeks away from being in shape." Consequently, he doesn't flirt with the over-training spiral, enjoys the experience, and can still compete at a high level.

In 2016, he set a goal of beating his Ironman time from 1991 (9:48 in Hawaii). Following the primal principles of fat adapted eating and training, Michael torched Ironman Arizona in 9:34 - this on the heels a runner-up finish at the Sprint World Championships. Michael did some interesting fat-adapted training strategies like doing slow, fat burning 8-mile runs both morning and night, the better to prepare him for the fatigued slow running in an Ironman. Inspired by his swimming background, he talks about why developing excellent technique is critical to improving aerobic function, and advocates workouts featuring short bursts of faster efforts. This helps you refine technique without excess stress on the heart. Learn great practical tips and also become inspired by Michael's incredible longevity and recent Ironman comeback.

 

What were the early days like for Michael as a young triathlete and eventually ending up as a coach? [00:01:16] 

Why is he considered to be a "Lazy Trainer?" [00:03:23] 

Has he still been competing for the past 30 years? [00:07:31] 

What happened when he did an Ironman after all these years? [00:09:39] 

What were his different strategies then? [00:13:10] 

How is it that good athletes look like they make so little effort? [00:14:19] 

Do it right.  Do it faster. What does that mean? [00:17:01] 

Why is it important to learn how to swim in a wet suit? [00:21:01] 

How does his training differ today compared to when he started his career? [00:22:30] 

How did his return Ironman performance compare? [00:29:45] 

What is his training program like? [00:32:39]                                    

Breakthrough Triathlete Training

Michael Collins, Coach

Feb 7, 2017

Ketone burning has assorted health and performance benefits, including drug-like anti-inflammatory properties and neuro-protective benefits. As a clean burning fuel (less oxidative stress than dirty burning glucose) it’s especially helpful to the brain. When your brain gets more oxygen and better neurotransmitter function during exercise, workouts seem easier and you consequently recover faster, as validated by the Central Governor Theory, which proposes that the brain is the ultimate governor of physical performance, not the peripheral muscles.

Some of the laboratory results from keto endurance pioneers are nothing short of astonishing. Peter Attia went from burning 95% glucose and 5% fat at “all day pace” to 22% glucose and 78% after a dietary adaptation period. Ironman triathlete Sami Inkinen took his “time to bonk” value from 5 hours up to 86 hours after keto-adapting his diet. Athletes in the FASTER study burned twice as much fat per minute as was previously believed to be the human limit. WOW! Try it for yourself but give it six weeks, and get more tips in the next Interval show.

Feb 3, 2017

Lindsay Taylor—Goal Setting Starts With Sleep!

This show was intended to cover goal setting in various categories for a healthy, successful 2017. We started with sleep since sleep is #1 and never left that topic. Enjoy this fast moving show that issues up a challenge to you: Can you get your sleep handled? Don’t forget this strongly influences your success with weight loss (regulation of appetite and fat storage hormones), endurance performance, and cognitive performance. If you can’t prioritize sleep (typically this means sacrificing digital screen entertainment in the evenings), you are unlikely to succeed with your pursuit of other goals requiring discipline and sacrifice. Enjoy the show, but if it’s past your bedtime, then listen tomorrow!

 

How is it that she completed the Ironman in a better time than anticipated? [00:00:51] 

What are some of the considerations for preparing yourself for your busy life in this new year? [00:03:47] 

Why is sleep the most important consideration of all? [00:06:44] 

How does one monitor the goals they have set for themselves? [00:09:15] 

How can we learn to focus and prioritize sleep? [00:13:16]

Jan 31, 2017

Fine-tuning Fat Adaption to Prepare for a Keto Experiment 

On the heels of the numerous Interval shows on transitioning to Primal-style eating, host Brad Kearns discusses practical steps you can take to try a ketogenic eating period and experience the wide-ranging benefits. 

First, explore the edges of your fat adaptation abilities by delaying your first morning meals until WHEN - When Hunger Ensues Naturally. Next, try some fasted workouts to further your progress quickly. Remember, there is no reason to struggle or suffer like dieters do. Fat adaptation will happen naturally if you cultivate intuitive appetite strategies. To get going into keto, adhere to a dietary pattern of 50 grams of carbs per day or less, and don’t overdo protein either. Consider trying the new exogenous ketone supplements like Kegenix, KetoCaNa, Pruvit, Ketopia, InstaKetones, etc.  These supplements can be especially effective when used in the morning to kick-start ketone burning and help you fast, or before workouts as a clean burning energy source, or when you have energy lulls that might prompt sugar cravings. 

We talk about the best way to test for ketones (portable blood meter; forget about the urine strips) and the fact that sometimes highly fat-adapted athletes can deliver low readings because they are using the ketones they produce and because they don’t need that many. 

Jan 27, 2017

Host Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

Wolfgang's question: Should I stick with my MAF heart rate even though aerobic threshold is different according to my lab reports? [00:01:28] 

How can I reconcile traditional training with Primal Endurance when I am coaching? [00:10:27] 

Jeff's question is about his previous mind set of judging others for their addictions as he now realizes he is in the same boat as the others. He needs to know what to do about his sugar addiction.  [00:15:28] 

Jenny's question: What is known about how one trains and its effects on the risk of heart disease? [00:20:26] 

Brad discusses the arbitrary distances of some races and questions the purpose of them. [00:23:23] 

Kevin's question: What should my fueling strategy be in distance racing? [00:29:28] 

Run For Your Life: But Not too Far and At a Slow Pace

Running on Empty

Zach Bitter

Jan 25, 2017

Ryan Hurst is the co-founder and action man behind the wildly popular GMB Fitness. A former martial artist and longtime resident of Japan, Ryan brings a gentle, evolved approach to fitness that is beautifully evident in this fascinating interview. Ryan shares how training strategies he developed through decades of competitive gymnastics and martial arts can help anyone not only reach their goals faster, but also prevent injuries and improve their performance in any activity—from powerlifting to endurance sports. Ask your body what it has to deliver each day and don't push beyond what you are capable of that day--patience and discipline will get you from wound tight to doing the splits in only a year.

In sharp contrast to a “get-shredded-at-all-costs” message that dominates much of the fitness world, the GMB method appeals to a broad audience of people who want to overcome the challenges of getting older, expand their mobility and prevent injury, and experience physical autonomy and freedom in their daily lives. Check out GMB’s free bodyweight exercise circuit to find out more about the featured ‘assessments’ in the interview -  like the Bear, Monkey, and Frogger. The interview concludes on some fun, interesting tangents like the cultural differences between USA and Japan. In conclusion, Ryan reminds us to move more each day, do little things to improve health, and strive to improve a bit each day instead of be a hero and crush occasional brutal workouts."

 

What is GMB Fitness and how did it get started? [00:01:01] 

How can people get help from you for improving what they can get from their bodies? [00:04:28] 

What are some fundamentals you start with for the regular guy who wants to stay fit? [00:09:07] 

Ryan is describing some of the things a person finds when starting the program?  [00:13:24] 

How is this program connected with gymnastics? [00:17:09] 

How does the Western cultural attitude about aging differ from Japanese? [00:23:45] 

If you can improve a little bit every day, you will have success and enjoy it on the way. [00:28:18] 

What kind of feedback has he received from his students about his program? [00:32:17] 

Resources:
- https://gmb.io/hip-mobility/
- https://gmb.io/resilience/
- gmb.io/get/bodyweight-training/

Jan 24, 2017

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Become bonk proof when you get your carb intake down low enough (50g/day or less) to produce ketones in place of glucose for your metabolic needs. Listen to the amazing laboratory validated exploits of Sami Inkinen (time to bonk improved from 5 hours to 86 hours!) and Peter Attia (went from burning 95% glucose and 5% fat at “all day pace”, to 22% glucose/78% fat after ketogenic eating experiment). Regale at the tale of Speedgolf world champion Rob Hogan violently recalibrated his appetite hormones thru not refueling during nor after a succession of depleting workouts to the extent that he crosses over to the dark side and became fat- and keto-adapted for ever more. And appreciate how Malibu yoga master and endurance machine Ted McDonald conquered the Inca trail with glucose in his fanny pack for psychological security, but not needing it due to radical fat adaptation. 

Enjoy this show about the cutting edge of fat and keto-adaptation, and be sure to go back and listen to each one to get fully enrolled in the Primal eating strategy. 

Jan 20, 2017

Lindsay Taylor - Psychology of the Endurance Athlete

Host Brad Kearns welcomes back Primal Blueprint Publishing’s own Lindsay Taylor, Ph.D. to discuss big picture items like trusting the process and cultivating an intuitive approach. Lindsay has fielded many questions from listeners/readers lately on social media, and “how do I know {slowing down} is working?” is a prominent one. Do you feel better and have an overall higher enjoyment of life? Then it’s working!

Lindsay explains that you should cost/benefit analyze every workout and mindfully recommit to your long term goals. This will help you couter the forces of peer pressure and the flawed prevailing approach that promotes chronic exercise patterns. 

The conversation continues into the hot topic of ketogenic endurance training. There may be some misinterpretations and hype out there due to the sudden popularity, so the best approach is to conduct a personal experiment (n=1) to see how you respond to dietary modification. When it comes to balancing the instant gratification goal of being happy with long-term lifestyle goals like goal races or weight loss, realize the fulfillment—having a purposeful and meaningful life—is more rewarding than the pursuit of fleeting happiness. It requires sacrifice to achieve great things and you can’t expect to always be happy. Enjoy this thoughtful program with Lindsay and send your own questions to primalblueprint.com/endurance

 

Why is it that so few people really trust the premise that if one can slow down in training it will help them go faster? [00:01:04] 

Why do so many focus on heart rates, distances, times...looking for numbers rather than: "How do I feel?"[00:02:46]

How do I know I am making the right decision today regarding my training schedule? [00:06:26] 

What is the rationale behind this type of approach of slowing down? [00:11:45] 

Why are people so fearful of trying ketosis and the primal/paleo lifestyle? [00:13:44] 

How hard is it to make new choices when making the commitment to change? Will it make me happy? [00:27:04] 

How can one maintain a positive outlook when these changes are so difficult? [00:32:55] 

Jan 18, 2017

Host Brad Kearns welcomes back Dr. Cate for part two of their meeting together. She has been hard at work preparing the launch of her revised and updated bestseller Deep Nutrition, originally published in 2008 and is relaunching a 512-page masterpiece in 2017. Cate gives you the straight scoop on her favorite topics, particularly the disastrous misinformation about dietary fats that has been entrenched in conventional wisdom for decades. Cate details why "natural fats" are so critical to human health, and how refined high polyunsaturated vegetable oils are directly responsible for hundreds of thousands of premature deaths annually. They disrupt normal cellular function immediately upon ingestion, increase oxidative stress throughout the body, and damage brain function in particular; this is the #1 disease catalyst in modern life, an underlying factor in every chronic disease study. 

Cate outs conventional wisdom as conducting a massive experiment to "feed modern humans the cheapest possible food and see what will happen." She outs researcher Ancel Keys as the dude who drove us toward bad fats and away from healthy fats ("he knew he was wrong too!" laments Cate). Speaking of losing weight, refined polyunsaturated vegetable oils are more likely to be stored and less likely to be burned than natural fats. In summary, here's how to save your life and optimize your health: Ditch refined high polyunsaturated vegetable oils (watch out when dining out; most restaurant food--fast food to fine dining--is soaked in these gnarly oils); eat more natural fats (eggs, meat, cheese, coconut products, olives/olive oil, avocados/avocado oil, etc.).

Cate also gets talking about carbs and says timing is important: breakfast carbs are muy mal noticias, while post-exercise carbs are okay to replenish glycogen and meet basic glucose needs of at least 30-60g/day. while 100g/day is a good max to observe. Also if you are going keto, note that both excess fat and protein are going to block ketone production.

 

What does sugar do that makes it so bad for us? [00:01:00]

What does it mean that 60-80 percent of our diet is sugars and vegetable oils, leaving only 20 percent for the nutritious food? [00:03:16] 

What are the four pillars of diet that Dr. Cate describes? [00:04:27] 

How does Dr. Cate describe fat burning, especially for the athlete? [00:06:44] 

How can we get some of that fat off when we want to? [00:11:26] 

After exercise is it okay to consume carbs? [00:13:17] 

What are her thoughts about the timing of the meals? [00:17:23] 

 So it is okay to eat carbs? [00:18:56]

What do they mean by "insulin bath?" [00:21:40] 

Does fasting help in becoming a fat burner? [00:24:54]

Jan 17, 2017

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

How fat adapted are you? Well, try skipping breakfast and waiting till you are actually hungry. Then try fasted workouts - can you run 4 miles in the morning without food? or 8 miles? Or bike 25 or 50 miles? You can also get a glucometer and check fasting blood sugar with a simple prick of your finger - check it before and after a workout to see if you can stabilize.

In contrast, if you are stuck in carb dependency, your mood, appetite, energy level and performance fluctuate according to your meal habits. Don’t forget your body’s hard-wired genetic mechanism to avoid depletion and exhaustion, and consequently overeating. Watch out for commercial energy bars which are almost all high carbs. Don’t even get me started on the hassles of trying to slam down carbs during sustained endurance performance - 60% of Hawaii ironman people have stomach distress. 

Jan 13, 2017

Host Brad Kearns visits with legendary American marathon runner Meb Keflezghi, whose longevity and ability to peak for championship events is arguably unrivaled in the history of elite running. Meb has had a 20-year run as a world-class runner and is still going strong at age 41! Meb was the 2004 Olympic silver medalist in the marathon in Athens, and made the 2016 Olympic team in the marathon at age 41. This historic performance defied our normal perception of aging for world-class runners. Meb’s historic Boston Marathon victory in 2014, the year after the bombings and the first win by a US runner in decades, was hailed as one of the most dramatic victories ever in running.

Meb’s unique approach to distance running offers practical tips and inspiration for runners of all ability levels. Meb discusses following a 9-day training cycle instead of the typical 7-day (gives him more time to recover) and his attention to a holistic approach, where he emphasizes stretching, mobility work, cross training with his interesting ElliptoGo machine, and constant attention to recovery.  Meb claims that a one-hour run actually takes two hours, what with the preparation time, drills and perhaps driving to the most suitable location (such as grass instead of pavement). An interesting tidbit: if you are absent-mindedly feeling/rubbing a sore joint or muscle, your brain is telling you that you have an injury problem - pay attention! You can count on Meb to avoid injuries and peak for big events. Listen when he says it’s better to be at 85-95% fitness than 101% and invite injury and burnout

Meb is a guy who gives back to the running community and inspires young runners. Listen to the true story of how he befriended a young collegiate runner (a friend of Brad’s) after a chance meeting in Mammoth and invited him to his crib to watch track on TV--the very first day young Tommy moved to Mammoth to train with the best! 

If you don’t know Meb’s story about emigrating from Eritrea to San Diego with his large family, check out his books, Run to Overcome. Read Meb 4 Mortals for training guidance and inspiration. Enjoy this podcast with one of the true legends and great inspirations of running. 

 

How has he maintained his magnificent career for over twenty years? [00:03:39] 

What has your brother contributed to your career? [00:10:28] 

How did the U.S. evolve in the distance running sport? [00:12:38] 

How has Meb contributed to the youngsters in the sport? [00:15:58] 

How does one use goal-setting into success? [00:19:23] 

What is the ElliptoGo? [00:22:07] 

What does he mean about focusing on "the small things?"[00:24:24] 

Injuries in runners are prevalent. What does Meb say about this problem [00:27:09] 

What is his theory about the 9-day training cycle? [00:31:37] 

What is the future of this athlete and where is the sport headed? [00:33:57] 

Jan 11, 2017

Host Brad Kearns welcomes back one of the most popular guests from the old days! Dr. Cate has been hard at work preparing the launch of her revised and updated bestseller Deep Nutrition, originally published in 2008 and is relaunching a 512-page masterpiece in 2017. Cate gives you the straight scoop on her favorite topics, particularly the disastrous misinformation about dietary fats that has been entrenched in conventional wisdom for decades. Cate details why "natural fats" are so critical to human health, and how refined high polyunsaturated vegetable oils are directly responsible for hundreds of thousands of premature deaths annually. They disrupt normal cellular function immediately upon ingestion, increase oxidative stress throughout the body, and damage brain function in particular; this is the #1 disease catalyst in modern life, an underlying factor in every chronic disease study. 

Cate outs conventional wisdom as conducting a massive experiment to "feed modern humans the cheapest possible food and see what will happen." She outs researcher Ancel Keys as the dude who drove us toward bad fats and away from healthy fats ("he knew he was wrong too!" laments Cate). Speaking of losing weight, refined polyunsaturated vegetable oils are more likely to be stored and less likely to be burned than natural fats. In summary, here's how to save your life and optimize your health: Ditch refined high polyunsaturated vegetable oils (watch out when dining out; most restaurant food--fast food to fine dining--is soaked in these gnarly oils); eat more natural fats (eggs, meat, cheese, coconut products, olives/olive oil, avocados/avocado oil, etc.).

Cate also gets talking about carbs and says timing is important: breakfast carbs are muy mal noticias, while post-exercise carbs are okay to replenish glycogen and meet basic glucose needs of at least 30-60g/day. while 100g/day is a good max to observe. Also if you are going keto, note that both excess fat and protein are going to block ketone production.


What is some of the new information she came across when she worked on getting her best-selling book "Deep Nutrition" revised? [00:01:22] 

Since the 1950s Americans have been participating in an experiment to see what would happen by eating the cheapest possible food. [00:03:36] 

Somewhere between 30 and 60 percent of our calories are coming from the "bad" oils. [00:09:54] 

The fellow, Ancel Keys, who conducted these studies, found that the information they put out was wrong. [00:13:04] 

How are these vegetable oils damaging to brain function? [00:15:25] 

Why were the saturated fats suspected, in the first place, of being so damaging? [00:17:23] 

What do we know about lipoproteins? [00:21:14] 

Where do carbs come into the picture? What about lard? [00:22:50] 

Why are the liquid vegetable oils bad? [00:24:56] 

Forty percent of total calories from restaurants are from vegetable oils because of the methods of cooking even in the finest restaurants. [00:28:19] 

Dr. Cate Shanahan

Jan 10, 2017

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Once you are fat adapted, you can fine-tune your insulin sensitivity and fat adaptation by engaging in Intermittent Fasting and fasted workouts. When you get depleted and experience true hunger, realize that this offers a powerful opportunity to rewire appetite hormones to escape sugar dependency and become more fat adapted. 

When the prominent hunger hormone ghrelin spikes and you reward yourself with a sweet treat, you hard-wire the connection between pleasure (spikes of dopamine and opioids) and the sugar. If you instead try to fast a bit and/or satisfy your hunger with a high fat food, you can actually alter the neural mediation of food reward. Warning - don’t try this at home unless you are full-on fat adapted and can actually benefit from fasting and fine-tuning without sugar crashing. 

The cellular stress of fasting triggers mitochondrial biogenesis. So does ketogenic eating, because fat and ketones utilize more mitochondria and burn more cleanly than glucose. Fasting and ketogenic eating also boost health with a profound anti-inflammatory effect, and also promoting improved autophagy - cell repair and regeneration. In contrast, overfeeding and routinely eating regular meals to the point of overfeeding can accelerate cell division, which is the essence of accelerated aging. 

The psychological effect of becoming fat adapted/ketogenic can help endurance athletes to not obsess about caloric needs during performance. Enjoy trippy Johnny G anecdotes about long rides on no food in old times.  It can help those struggling with dieting and calorie obsession to become liberated from negative emotional connections to eating, because they are no longer physically dependent upon regular meals. 

Jan 6, 2017

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

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