Info

Primal Endurance Podcast

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.
RSS Feed Subscribe in iTunes
Primal Endurance Podcast
2017
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: 2016
Dec 30, 2016

Host Brad Kearns covers the final four habits, picking up from the part 1 show of the first 3 habits as follows: 

4.         Aerobic Emphasis: Endurance success is primarily dependent on aerobic efficiency. Aerobic base building delivers by far your best return on investment, and is best achieved by strictly limiting heart rate to aerobic max or lower during defined aerobic workouts and training periods. Stay out of the black hole, and don’t venture into high-intensity training blocks before you have a strong base.

5.         Intensity Structure: Intensity can deliver exceptional results for endurance athletes, when a strong base is present, when workouts are brief in duration and really intense, when they are conducted only when you are highly motivated and energized, and during defined periods that are short in duration and always followed by a rest period and preceded by an aerobic period.

6.         Complementary practices: Increased general daily movement, spontaneous, unstructured play sessions, mobility work such as technique drills and dynamic stretching, movement practices like yoga and Pilates, and high-intensity strength training are essential for success, because we live sedentary lives of extreme physical ease. 

7.         Periodization: An annual program always commences with an aerobic base period (minimum eight weeks). With success, high-intensity periods can follow, with a maximum duration of four weeks. Intensity periods are followed by micro periods of rest, followed by aerobic, followed by a return to intensity/ competition. The annual program always ends with an extended rest period or off-season, followed by a new macro aerobic base period to commence a new annual program. 

What does it mean to say "aerobic emphasis?" [00:00:50] 

What does "structured intensity" mean? [00:05:09] 

Complimentary practices are essential to our success.  [00:12:51] 

What is periodization? [00:17:31]

Dec 27, 2016

Primal Eating Step 2: Commit to Primal Foods

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Make a sincere commitment to ditch offensive, nutrient devoid foods for three weeks and replace this junk with your favorite choices from the primal-approved lineup of meat, fish, fowl, eggs, vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds—and modern additions like high fat dairy and dark chocolate. 

This effectively results in a higher fat, lower carb diet than the Standard American Diet. Beware the slippery slope that is carb addiction (sugar and wheat have powerful addictive properties akin to opiates)—satisfy yourself with nutrient dense, high fat meals and snacks so you don’t struggle or suffer.

Dec 23, 2016

Host Brad Kearns covers a key takeaway from the Primal Endurance book, the list of 7 habits for success in endurance endeavors. In this show, Brad covers the first few habits as follows:

  1. Sleep: Sleep comes in at number one. Brad says it's the next frontier of performance breakthroughs in all sports, especially endurance sports. Quick tips: minimize artificial light and digital stimulation after dark; and awaken each morning, without an alarm, refreshed and energized. If you are training more, sleep more. If you can’t honor the aforementioned maxims, stop training until you can. 

    2. Stress/Rest Balance: Primal-style endurance training allows you to reach for higher highs (breakthrough workouts) and observe lower lows (more rest, shorter, easier recovery workouts, and staying below aerobic maximum heart rate at the vast majority of workouts). It appeals to your competitive intensity by focusing on peak performance and recovery, instead of focusing on the awed notion of “consistency” in this context. 

    3. Intuitive and Personalized: Your training schedule is sensible, intuitive, flexible, and even spontaneous instead of regimented and preordained. Respect your daily life circumstances, motivation levels, stress levels, energy levels, immune function, and moods. This means backing off when tired, but also pursuing breakthrough workouts when you feel great!

Why is sleep so Important? What is so bad about artificial light? How should we "stage" the bedroom? [00:01:00] 

How does one get balance between rest and stress? [00:09:26] 

How can you make your schedule intuitive and personalized? [00:16:21] 

Lights Out:  Sugar, Sleep, and Survival

Dec 20, 2016

Primal Eating Step 1: Ditch grains, sugars and refined oils

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

The first step to going primal is to get rid of the most offensive foods in the Standard American Diet: sugars, grains and refined high polyunsaturated vegetable oils. These foods promote carb dependency, inflammation, and oxidative damage. Besides, they have no nutritional value. Knowing that chronic cardio promotes carb dependency, you must slow down your training pace before you even attempt a dietary transition. 

Realize that besides contributing to overall excess carb intake (grains, even whole grains, convert to glucose upon ingestion), the gluten and other lectins in grains contribute to leaky gut syndrome. The bad oils are particularly insidious—“radiation in a bottle” says Dr. Cate Shanahan. They cause an immediate disruption in healthy cell function and disregulated fat metabolism.

Dec 16, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Brad goes down memory lane to discuss the progression of his training schedule during his career on the pro triathlon circuit (this was meant to be an Interval show but Brad got on a roll and produced a substantial length program that gives you an excellent overview of the folly of adhering to regimented schedules and the benefits of being more intuitive).
 
After struggling to adhere to a nice, pretty, balanced workout schedule each week for the early years of his professional career, Brad and his coach Mark Sisson strategized to loosen up the decision making strategies a bit to promote a more intuitive and fluid approach. At first, Brad tried stacking two hard days in a row (long hilly bike ride and a long, hard hilly run), following by several days of rest/easy training, to better promote recovery and take advantage of the stress hormone buzz that allows you to perform great athletic feats when you are in sympathetic dominant state. 
 
Brad then describes the ultimate progression of the training program to reject the concept of weekly schedules entirely and just strategize workouts to address competitive weaknesses and point for competitive events in the future. Spinning out of the regimented schedule approach in 1991 allowed Brad to make his hard workouts harder, rest and recovery more effectively, and achieve performance breakthroughs and win two US national championships and reach #3 world-ranking in 1991. It's all about stressing the body at the right times with key workouts and allowing rest and recovery to always be of the utmost importance. 
Dec 13, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

The incredibly simple, sensible, stress-free approach to training detailed by 2016 Olympic bronze medalist (and 2008 Olympic silver medalist) Nick Willis of New Zealand. Nick has had an amazing career as a miler, and at 34 he became the oldest 1500m medalist in Olympic history. Nick decided that in order to extend his career and enjoy a healthy, balanced life, including appreciating family time, furthering his education, and enjoying hobbies like Speedgolf (Nick is a top-10 level Speedgolf pro), he streamlined his training approach to spend less time/fewer miles to stay fresh, and to trade out stuff he didn't enjoy (lengthy gym strength training sessions) for stuff that was more time efficient (a few minutes of sprints and plyos at the end of workouts). Nick only runs once a day and takes a day off each week, but he is one of the fastest milers in history. Take inspiration from Nick's example as he shatters the stereotype of the Olympic runner being an imbalanced cyborg robot training machine.

Dec 9, 2016

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

 

What is the Primal Endurance audio book? [00:00:55] 

When a person is training for a half marathon on a hilly course should they do any specific hill work? [00:02:50] 

How does one acclimate to race conditions in a climate or time zone other than what we are used to? [00:06:16] 

How does one deal with anxiety when skipping a meal or mental fatigue while they are adapting to the primal lifestyle? [00:12:50] 

What kind of nutrition do I need for a high altitude race when I am really low carb normally? [00:21:10] 

This man experienced major burnout at age 25 and is now embracing primal. He still has long-term carb cravings. What can he do about monitoring the maximum heart rate? [00:25:52] 

When the HRV 56, it this too low. How should we try to increase this? [00:32:39] 

When trying to get into running, it seems to wreck my HRV even though I am training below aerobic. Should I not run? [00:35:13] 

In my recovery from burnout, what should I do in my training to build my fitness back? [00:35:54]

Dec 6, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Developing a strong aerobic base and transitioning to a primal-style diet are your foremost concerns to succeed as a fat burning beast and a lean, healthy, strong endurance athlete. At a certain point, brief, high intensity workouts can deliver a tremendous performance benefit. Box jumps or heavy squatting can put your body under load is such a way that simulates the fatigue you experience after many hours of hard racing. However, you have to be strategic about introducing intensity. There are no "hacks" in the endurance game to bypass the hours of aerobic work necessary. Introduce intensity when your base is strong, your MAF tests are showing steady improvement (test regularly, but only when you feel strong), and finally when your "desire to train" is strong, as Dr. Kelly Starrett likes to say. That's right, the intuitive sense that it's time to open the throttle is the #1 evaluation factor for introducing intensity. Brad jogs by a soccer field each day during his aerobic morning run with dogs, and once in a while he attacks the field for a handful of all-out sprints, when the urge strikes him. On prior shows, Andrew MacNaughton details how his training decisions are guided my his moods. Sounds goofy, but this actually represents the highest level of training sophistication for an endurance athlete.

Dec 2, 2016

Host Brad Kearns goes deep in part 2 with Andrew and Jordan. The trio discuss how attitudes, mindset and personality affect training approaches and decisions. They discuss the fine line between striving to move up a bit in the elite ranks and drifting into over-training patterns - a dilemma that athletes of all ability levels face in endurance sports. The conversations flows into many other directions, so enjoy the lively banter and pick up some good training insights.

Jordan Rapp and Andrew McNaughton help Brad talk about managing hills like "Rock Star" (in LA.) [00:00:59] 

What do they think about the advances in technology in the last 10 and 20 years? [00:05:36] 

Is it best to train according to your mood? [00:14:31] 

What is running? Is slower than 11-minute miles considered running? [00:20:51] 

Give credit to getting the enjoyment from the training and the races. [00:27:51] 

How has the doping problem manifested itself in the bicycling community? [00:29:34]

Nov 29, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Among the most common questions relating to the importance of training aerobically and the method of calculating, and rationale for, training at or below your maximum aerobic heart rate. Details on the adjustment factors to the "180-age" baseline calculation. Comparing and contrasting the Maffetone 180-age formula with the conventional approach of using percentage of max heart rate and ventilatory threshold. Hint: be conservative and avoid the risks of chronic exercise. This is a great show to refer to over and over to cement the idea that taking it easy and working the low end aerobic zone will pay great dividends to your racing performance at higher speeds.

Nov 25, 2016

Host Brad Kearns travels to the SoCal training hamlet of Newbury Park to talk with triathlon legend and frequent podcast guest Andrew and leading Ironman athlete and techie whiz Jordan Rapp. Jordan talks about his 2016 season, including his Ironman qualifier win and his experience racing with the elites in Kona. The trio talk about how technology has shaped the sport, and the assorted training approaches of elite athletes - commonalities and differences.

 

What is going with the racing records these days? [00:01:19] 

How did it go for Jordan Rapp recently? [00:07:55] 

How does one learn to get to be an accomplished athlete and not make mistakes in training? [00:09:42] 

How did Jordan decide to train for Kona? [00:14:05] 

Do some people take breaks during a race? [00:17:58] 

What is the stupidest thing anyone did as a pro and what do they learn from those experiences? [00:21:56]  

Are most of the pros from a swimming background? [00:27:11] 

Should the women pros get prize money equivalent to the men's purses [00:29:54] 

What are the benefits of training at less than 100 percent effort? [00:35:07] 

What about running at an all-out pace once in a while, like in a marathon [00:38:45] 

How many races can one do in the season and still get the proper rest? [00:44:32] 

 

Jordan Rapp

Nov 22, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Understanding how both aerobic and anaerobic workouts, and fasting and ketogenic eating, promote the development of new and more efficient mitochondria. Mitochondria are stimulated by stresses to the cell, such as burning energy during a workout or restricting calories instead of constantly overfeeding your cells (as is the case with a high carb Standard American Diet). Mitochondria are the energy producing power plants in your cells that burn energy cleanly and protect you from the oxidative damage that occurs from high stress modern life. Poorly functioning mitochondria pave the way for accelerated aging and increased disease risk. Primal Endurance style training, with both aerobic and anaerobic workouts (in proper balance), and fat-adapted eating patterns, help you build an efficient, clean burning energy power plant in your body.

Nov 18, 2016

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

What can a 51 year old man who has had a max heart rate of 129 for two weeks do when he is not seeing any improvement? [00:01:56] 

How long is too long for max aerobic heart rate? [00:06:07] 

How important is eating the primal diet for fitness and weight loss? [00:11:08] 

Can you thrive on the primal endurance program as a raw vegan and are there vegan-friendly nutritional tips? [00:11:50] 

A military man needs to prepare in four months for running 2, 4, and 6 miles as fast as possible. How does he prepare for this? [00:15:07] 

This 49 year old man lost 60 pounds (27 kilos) and feels great but he wants to know when to back off his intense activities. [00:18:04] 

Is aerobic exercise largely ineffective for weight loss? What does that mean? [00:22:49] 

What is he best way to get good at burning fat? [00:25:18] 

James wants to know how the Brownlee brothers manage to do so well when they do not follow a healthy eating style. (Junk food) [00:28:10] 

Is an aerobic only approach the best way to train for my upcoming race when I am pretty stressed right now? [00:33:39] 

Adam has lost some weight and has worked on lowering his per minute mile rate. While monitoring his heart rate, he has slowed his pace. Has been running barefoot for five years and is asking about what he can do about his pain in his calf and Achilles. [00:34:50] 

How can one treat plantar fasciitis? [00:38:37] 

Brownlee Brothers

Nick Willis Simply Running

Plantar Fasciitis

Stretching the gastroc and soleus

Simon Whitfield

Nov 15, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

The flawed conventional approach comes with a "struggle and suffer" mindset. Sub-4 minute mile legend Sir Roger Bannister said "struggle gives meaning and richness to life," but we need to clarify the meaning to understand that the struggle to push your athletic boundaries and achieve peak performance should be framed in a sensible, balanced approach that moderates stress and contributes to your overall health and well-being. The regimented, compulsive approach brings a much higher risk of breakdown and burnout. Cultivate an intuitive, inconsistent, spontaneous approach to training where you take what your body gives you each day and nothing more.
Nov 11, 2016
Host Brad Kearns keeps the momentum going with another Maffetone show, this time getting personal with questions about Brad's training methods and competitive results. Phil details his proclamation that you need never exceed 90% of max heart rate, even on your high intensity sessions. He describes the concept of "positive overreaching;" you need to stress the body to improve, but not too much that you break down or get into an over-training state. It's not the stress of occasional hard workouts that's troublesome, but the accumulation of stress that will "bury you," says Phil - and reminding us that it's not just training stress in the equation but life stress too. 
 
Brad bitches and moans to Phill about his "crash and burn" patterns, where he feels super and performs magnificent athletic feats one day, then heads into low periods where he drags in the am and needs a nap in the pm. Phil suggests that despite "normal, healthy" blood work and medical results, that something is indeed wrong, and that Brad (and other athletes) needs to do some detective work and n=1 experiments to look for solutions. Sometimes extreme experiments are warranted, such as a ketogenic eating period (recommended to Brad, who will try it again after a 3-week effort in April). Some more tidbits from Phil for athletes looking to maximize performance and health: ditch all refined carbs, of course, forever, no matter who you are! You become more insulin resistant with age, meaning you should eat fewer carbs; don't be afraid to use the "F" word - that is, eat plenty of fat so you don't backslide into carb cravings.
 
What is the difference between health and fitness? [00:00:52] 

How are team sports affected when some guys don't take care of themselves well? [00:05:22] 

One must never exceed 90 percent max heart rate in the anaerobic workouts. [00:08:46]

Are runners able to do well if they have only training anaerobically? [00:14:18] 

Brad's example in his experience in speed golf is testimony that this type of training really works. [00:16:07] 

When an athlete performs well over the years, eats healthy, sleeps plenty and then has a crash and burn. What is wrong?  What can he do? [00:19:26] 

It is a good idea to do a personal experiment with diet for several weeks to analyze this fatigue problem. [00:27:39] 

Does caloric deficit always result in weight loss? [00:29:00] 

Where can one find more information on the two-week test? [00:30:22] 

Does one have to stress the body in order to have the best performance? [00:32:21] 

Athletes Fit but Unhealthy

Carbohydrate Intolerance

Dr. Phil Maffetone

The Healthy Golfer

Nov 8, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Conventional endurance training is overly stressful and is making you fit, tired, and unhealthy. This show provides a basic overview of the Primal Endurance approach and how it differs from the chronic, obsessive/compulsive, overly stressful approach to endurance training. The endurance scene has been going strong for decades, but there seems to be a lingering problem of athletes choosing an overly stressful training approach. Primal Endurance will help you bust out and break through to a more enjoyable and effective approach to training. Bulleted list of benefits you'll enjoy with the Primal Endurance approach.

Nov 4, 2016

Host Brad Kearns catches up with Dr. Phil Maffetone, the aerobic training oracle in Oracle, AZ, host of PhilMaffetone.com, and author of The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing. It's been a while since Phil's been on the show - check the old episodes for some great commentary on aerobic training and balancing fitness and health. In recent years, Phil's strategies and principles have gained more mainstream acceptance among endurance athletes. Going slow really does make you fast in races! It's just tough to adhere to heart rate limits when you are a driven, Type-A endurance machine. Phil discusses how "it's all about stress" - moderating the stress of your training to avail continued improvement. Unfortunately, Phil details how endurance athletes are chronically "injured" - his broad definition including physical injuries, biochemical (hormone imbalances, adrenal burnout, etc.), and mental/emotional (depression/anxiety). The latter is prevalent but rarely discussed among endurance athletes. Yes, a constant anxiety about your workout times and volume is a source of stress and ultimately illness.

Phil contends that most endurance athletes believe they must be "willing to sacrifice health for fitness," but that this is absolutely unnecessary. However, endurance athletes must be willing to be patient with the process of aerobic development. Some other tidbits from the show: Diet and emotions can disturb neurotransmitter balance in the brain; Sugar intake causes overproduction of serotonin, delivering a sedative effect (hence, carbo loading is lame but still happens routinely); excessively anaerobic training progress arose from old school coaches familiar with interval training. And this interesting tidbit: a symptom of the early stages of over-training is performing well!; yes, this is due to over-stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. You must use intuition to regulate training stress and prevent a future crash when stress hormones burn out.

 

Dr. Phil Maffetone describes the importance of monitoring the heart rate and how that affects

the injuries of the endurance athlete. [00:00:35] 

Does mainstream medicine really understand the injuries of the endurance athlete? [00:06:30] 

What happens within the athlete when he feels anxiety or depression? [00:11:39] 

What happens to the neurotransmitters when you are walking around stressed and under

pressure? [00:14:48] 

What about carbo-loading? [00:16:04] 

What happened in the early days of coaching without proper information about aerobic

training? [00:16:55] 

What are the symptoms of overtraining? [00:24:32] 

How does the aerobic vs. anaerobic training impact ones well being?  [00:29:22] 

Can one get all they are seeking by not pushing themselves and still preserving their health?

[00:34:51]

Oct 28, 2016

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

Oct 17, 2016

Host Brad Kearns talks to WHOLE Athlete Podcast hostess Debbie Potts—author, personal trainer and 6-time Hawaii Ironman finisher. Debbie relates her story of suffering from sudden and severe adrenal burnout while racing at the peak of her career, and her awakening and recalibrating toward health with her WHOLEistic Method.

For you type-A athletes who are accustomed to burning the candle at both ends, this is a very important podcast to listen and reflect upon. Debbie was a knowledgeable and carefully trained athlete, a super healthy Paleo-style eater, and an inspiration to her personal clients and training partners. Out of nowhere her health fell apart, upon reflection a logical consequence of simply doing more than her body could handle – even though she felt energized and empowered during her journey. It was a journey featuring 15 ironmans in 11 years, with busy days starting at 4:30 AM running her own studio and training clients. Then suddenly, all that was precious to her was taken away and she plunged into serious health dysfunction. Enjoy the show from Debbie's home in Bellevue, Washington, and check out her WHOLE Athlete podcast too.

Oct 7, 2016

Host Brad Kearns talks to Dr. Marc Bubbs, sport nutrition lead for Canada Basketball and the men's Olympic Basketball team, and progressive healer in Toronto. Marc is the author of The Paleo Project, a book about personalizing your approach to paleo eating and living. Mark applies a comprehensive approach to his elite athletes and ordinary citizens he treats at his Toronto clinic. He offers interesting insights on a wide range of topics, including:

- Paleo & Performance

- Olympic medical teams view of Paleo

- Mental game - how food impacts cognition

- Napping and performance

- Gut health in NBA players

Some interesting one-liners from Marc:

Acute medical care is phenomenal but when there is no distinct pathology present, the patient must seek alternative care pointed toward wellness

90% of modern disease is lifestyle related, but physicians get very little training in healthy lifestyle practices or prevention.

It's important for athletes to focus on process, not outcome. This will prevent choking and lead to greater long-term enjoyment and fulfillment

if you don't get enough sleep, your reaction time decreases four-fold - for example, a baseball player looking for the pitch will struggle royally just because he missed some sleep.

Overreaching vs overtraining: Slightly exceeding your capacity delivers fitness benefits. The trick is to balance that fine line and avoid overtraining.

Testing for gut health: Gut health is a hot topic in alternative health circles, but few people can specify what is a healthy gut and what is a compromised gut. Dr. Mark suggests you can obtain a complete stool analysis to reveal levels of good bacteria, bad bacteria, and inflammatory markers. Dr. Marc mentions the Microbial Organic Acids Tests (MOAT) from Great Plains Labs and the Complete Stool Analysis (CSA) from Doctor's Data. If things look suspect on these results, you then seek alternative health care.

All in all, a great show for endurance athletes to delve deeper into the world of functional medicine and alternative health care.

Sep 30, 2016

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

Sep 24, 2016

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

Sep 16, 2016

Host Brad Kearns welcomes Lindsay back to the show (yeah, we had a lunch break for a fabulous primal salad at Lindsay's house) for a second podcast. We pick up the momentum from Lindsay's first show, where she commented on the ideal endurance athlete mindset and goal setting process. Sneak preview: It's essential to constantly recommit to intrinsic goals that align well with your personality.

Sep 13, 2016

Primal Endurance Podcast goes deep with Primal Blueprint Publishing's very own Lindsay Taylor, PhD., UC Berkeley trained behavioral psychologist, lead writer/editor for Primal projects, busy soccer mom and ironman triathlete. Lindsay talks about the psychological aspects of endurance training, including topics like goal setting, understanding your personality to match your environmental circumstances accordingly, and the value of intrinsic motivation versus extrinsic.

Sep 2, 2016
Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.
1 2 Next »