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Primal Endurance Podcast

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.
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Now displaying: November, 2016
Nov 29, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Among the most common questions relating to the importance of training aerobically and the method of calculating, and rationale for, training at or below your maximum aerobic heart rate. Details on the adjustment factors to the "180-age" baseline calculation. Comparing and contrasting the Maffetone 180-age formula with the conventional approach of using percentage of max heart rate and ventilatory threshold. Hint: be conservative and avoid the risks of chronic exercise. This is a great show to refer to over and over to cement the idea that taking it easy and working the low end aerobic zone will pay great dividends to your racing performance at higher speeds.

Nov 25, 2016

Host Brad Kearns travels to the SoCal training hamlet of Newbury Park to talk with triathlon legend and frequent podcast guest Andrew and leading Ironman athlete and techie whiz Jordan Rapp. Jordan talks about his 2016 season, including his Ironman qualifier win and his experience racing with the elites in Kona. The trio talk about how technology has shaped the sport, and the assorted training approaches of elite athletes - commonalities and differences.

 

What is going with the racing records these days? [00:01:19] 

How did it go for Jordan Rapp recently? [00:07:55] 

How does one learn to get to be an accomplished athlete and not make mistakes in training? [00:09:42] 

How did Jordan decide to train for Kona? [00:14:05] 

Do some people take breaks during a race? [00:17:58] 

What is the stupidest thing anyone did as a pro and what do they learn from those experiences? [00:21:56]  

Are most of the pros from a swimming background? [00:27:11] 

Should the women pros get prize money equivalent to the men's purses [00:29:54] 

What are the benefits of training at less than 100 percent effort? [00:35:07] 

What about running at an all-out pace once in a while, like in a marathon [00:38:45] 

How many races can one do in the season and still get the proper rest? [00:44:32] 

 

Jordan Rapp

Nov 22, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Understanding how both aerobic and anaerobic workouts, and fasting and ketogenic eating, promote the development of new and more efficient mitochondria. Mitochondria are stimulated by stresses to the cell, such as burning energy during a workout or restricting calories instead of constantly overfeeding your cells (as is the case with a high carb Standard American Diet). Mitochondria are the energy producing power plants in your cells that burn energy cleanly and protect you from the oxidative damage that occurs from high stress modern life. Poorly functioning mitochondria pave the way for accelerated aging and increased disease risk. Primal Endurance style training, with both aerobic and anaerobic workouts (in proper balance), and fat-adapted eating patterns, help you build an efficient, clean burning energy power plant in your body.

Nov 18, 2016

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air. Some recurring themes are coming through with many questioners. In particular, the questioning how "180-age" aerobic maximum heart rate limit applies to real-life goals and the desire to open up the throttle now and then and get race ready. While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

What can a 51 year old man who has had a max heart rate of 129 for two weeks do when he is not seeing any improvement? [00:01:56] 

How long is too long for max aerobic heart rate? [00:06:07] 

How important is eating the primal diet for fitness and weight loss? [00:11:08] 

Can you thrive on the primal endurance program as a raw vegan and are there vegan-friendly nutritional tips? [00:11:50] 

A military man needs to prepare in four months for running 2, 4, and 6 miles as fast as possible. How does he prepare for this? [00:15:07] 

This 49 year old man lost 60 pounds (27 kilos) and feels great but he wants to know when to back off his intense activities. [00:18:04] 

Is aerobic exercise largely ineffective for weight loss? What does that mean? [00:22:49] 

What is he best way to get good at burning fat? [00:25:18] 

James wants to know how the Brownlee brothers manage to do so well when they do not follow a healthy eating style. (Junk food) [00:28:10] 

Is an aerobic only approach the best way to train for my upcoming race when I am pretty stressed right now? [00:33:39] 

Adam has lost some weight and has worked on lowering his per minute mile rate. While monitoring his heart rate, he has slowed his pace. Has been running barefoot for five years and is asking about what he can do about his pain in his calf and Achilles. [00:34:50] 

How can one treat plantar fasciitis? [00:38:37] 

Brownlee Brothers

Nick Willis Simply Running

Plantar Fasciitis

Stretching the gastroc and soleus

Simon Whitfield

Nov 15, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

The flawed conventional approach comes with a "struggle and suffer" mindset. Sub-4 minute mile legend Sir Roger Bannister said "struggle gives meaning and richness to life," but we need to clarify the meaning to understand that the struggle to push your athletic boundaries and achieve peak performance should be framed in a sensible, balanced approach that moderates stress and contributes to your overall health and well-being. The regimented, compulsive approach brings a much higher risk of breakdown and burnout. Cultivate an intuitive, inconsistent, spontaneous approach to training where you take what your body gives you each day and nothing more.
Nov 11, 2016
Host Brad Kearns keeps the momentum going with another Maffetone show, this time getting personal with questions about Brad's training methods and competitive results. Phil details his proclamation that you need never exceed 90% of max heart rate, even on your high intensity sessions. He describes the concept of "positive overreaching;" you need to stress the body to improve, but not too much that you break down or get into an over-training state. It's not the stress of occasional hard workouts that's troublesome, but the accumulation of stress that will "bury you," says Phil - and reminding us that it's not just training stress in the equation but life stress too. 
 
Brad bitches and moans to Phill about his "crash and burn" patterns, where he feels super and performs magnificent athletic feats one day, then heads into low periods where he drags in the am and needs a nap in the pm. Phil suggests that despite "normal, healthy" blood work and medical results, that something is indeed wrong, and that Brad (and other athletes) needs to do some detective work and n=1 experiments to look for solutions. Sometimes extreme experiments are warranted, such as a ketogenic eating period (recommended to Brad, who will try it again after a 3-week effort in April). Some more tidbits from Phil for athletes looking to maximize performance and health: ditch all refined carbs, of course, forever, no matter who you are! You become more insulin resistant with age, meaning you should eat fewer carbs; don't be afraid to use the "F" word - that is, eat plenty of fat so you don't backslide into carb cravings.
 
What is the difference between health and fitness? [00:00:52] 

How are team sports affected when some guys don't take care of themselves well? [00:05:22] 

One must never exceed 90 percent max heart rate in the anaerobic workouts. [00:08:46]

Are runners able to do well if they have only training anaerobically? [00:14:18] 

Brad's example in his experience in speed golf is testimony that this type of training really works. [00:16:07] 

When an athlete performs well over the years, eats healthy, sleeps plenty and then has a crash and burn. What is wrong?  What can he do? [00:19:26] 

It is a good idea to do a personal experiment with diet for several weeks to analyze this fatigue problem. [00:27:39] 

Does caloric deficit always result in weight loss? [00:29:00] 

Where can one find more information on the two-week test? [00:30:22] 

Does one have to stress the body in order to have the best performance? [00:32:21] 

Athletes Fit but Unhealthy

Carbohydrate Intolerance

Dr. Phil Maffetone

The Healthy Golfer

Nov 8, 2016

The Primal Endurance podcast Interval shows are published in between our full-length feature episodes published on Fridays. For the Interval episodes, podcast host Brad Kearns discusses various elements of the Primal Endurance approach, pulling from topics in the book/digital course and adding some candid and fresh insights. The Interval shows will keep you focused and purposeful with all of your workouts and lifestyle decisions.

Conventional endurance training is overly stressful and is making you fit, tired, and unhealthy. This show provides a basic overview of the Primal Endurance approach and how it differs from the chronic, obsessive/compulsive, overly stressful approach to endurance training. The endurance scene has been going strong for decades, but there seems to be a lingering problem of athletes choosing an overly stressful training approach. Primal Endurance will help you bust out and break through to a more enjoyable and effective approach to training. Bulleted list of benefits you'll enjoy with the Primal Endurance approach.

Nov 4, 2016

Host Brad Kearns catches up with Dr. Phil Maffetone, the aerobic training oracle in Oracle, AZ, host of PhilMaffetone.com, and author of The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing. It's been a while since Phil's been on the show - check the old episodes for some great commentary on aerobic training and balancing fitness and health. In recent years, Phil's strategies and principles have gained more mainstream acceptance among endurance athletes. Going slow really does make you fast in races! It's just tough to adhere to heart rate limits when you are a driven, Type-A endurance machine. Phil discusses how "it's all about stress" - moderating the stress of your training to avail continued improvement. Unfortunately, Phil details how endurance athletes are chronically "injured" - his broad definition including physical injuries, biochemical (hormone imbalances, adrenal burnout, etc.), and mental/emotional (depression/anxiety). The latter is prevalent but rarely discussed among endurance athletes. Yes, a constant anxiety about your workout times and volume is a source of stress and ultimately illness.

Phil contends that most endurance athletes believe they must be "willing to sacrifice health for fitness," but that this is absolutely unnecessary. However, endurance athletes must be willing to be patient with the process of aerobic development. Some other tidbits from the show: Diet and emotions can disturb neurotransmitter balance in the brain; Sugar intake causes overproduction of serotonin, delivering a sedative effect (hence, carbo loading is lame but still happens routinely); excessively anaerobic training progress arose from old school coaches familiar with interval training. And this interesting tidbit: a symptom of the early stages of over-training is performing well!; yes, this is due to over-stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. You must use intuition to regulate training stress and prevent a future crash when stress hormones burn out.

 

Dr. Phil Maffetone describes the importance of monitoring the heart rate and how that affects

the injuries of the endurance athlete. [00:00:35] 

Does mainstream medicine really understand the injuries of the endurance athlete? [00:06:30] 

What happens within the athlete when he feels anxiety or depression? [00:11:39] 

What happens to the neurotransmitters when you are walking around stressed and under

pressure? [00:14:48] 

What about carbo-loading? [00:16:04] 

What happened in the early days of coaching without proper information about aerobic

training? [00:16:55] 

What are the symptoms of overtraining? [00:24:32] 

How does the aerobic vs. anaerobic training impact ones well being?  [00:29:22] 

Can one get all they are seeking by not pushing themselves and still preserving their health?

[00:34:51]

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