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Primal Endurance Podcast

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.
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Now displaying: December, 2017
Dec 29, 2017

Host Brad Kearns leverages his previous podcast dedicated to older athletes by addressing some Q&A from folks out there fighting the battle, going for ambitious race goes in the older age categories. Everyone talks about how recovery takes longer when you get older, so let’s get into the particulars of making sound training decisions, optimizing recovery, and choosing age-appropriate goals and training methods.

Brad introduces this segment with thought provoking facts on aging. [00:00:59] 

A competitive Masters runner wants some advice on what he should do about speed work? [00:06:37] 

53-year-old Linda is asking for more information on glycogen storage while on Ketogenic diet. [00:12:51]

Larry is 56 years old and he "tests higher", even though he still uses the 180 minus my age formula for my workouts.  What is the problem? [00:15:10] 

Jim, age 65 is training for a marathon. Would it make sense to use a ketone supplement like Kegenics during endurance training and the marathon? [00:21:23] 

What about pairing of ketone supplement with conventional carbs like Gatorade or gel? [00:23:52] 

Brad closes this podcast with advice emanating from his experience as a competitive athlete. [00:25:37] 

Jeanne Calment

Nourish Balance Thrive

Dec 22, 2017

Picking up the momentum from the previous show, Brad and Andrew continue to debate the healthiest way to be a competitive athlete, especially as you deal with aging in the background. Topics include comprehensive health assessments like Brad's NourishBalanceThrive.com journey or that offered as part of Andrew's The Athletes Potential coaching services (andrewmacnaughton.com). Another important philosophical question: how much stress should you apply to training? We know that sprinting and high intensity interval training generate rapid performance improvements, but they also come with a high stress cost. It's important to optimize the stress/rest balance, and some good ideas are served up. Enjoy! Send your questions/comments to info@primalendurance.fit.

How do you know when your health and longevity are being compromised? [00:00:41] 

Number one marker for overtraining is: Do you have the desire to train? [00:02:59] 

What if you are always hungry or not hungry?  What does that tell you? [00:03:56] 

What does it mean: "adaptation phase"? [00:04:55] 

You usually cannot duplicate your big top performance because of stress. [00:07:15] 

Do we make too much of the intricacies of the preparations before the race? [00:09:51] 

How much do genetics come in to play for the training athlete? [00:12:25] 

Does it help to go back and look at your previous record to plan your current training plan? [00:15:50] 

How effective are the super training programs you hear about that get you ready for the races? [00:16:43] 

The final message from these two guys continues to be: train at a slow pace, relax, and enjoy what you are doing. [00:21:21] 

 

Nourish Balance Thrive

 

Dec 15, 2017

Host Brad Kearns welcomes back #1 most popular recurring guest, Andrew MacNaughton, after a long break from the show. The two get right into it with a discussion of the large looming philosophical question for passionate athletes: how to manage the inherent tradeoff between peak performance and health and longevity? Wait; is there even a necessary tradeoff between the two? Can you have your cake and eat it too--that is, can you be intensely competitive and while still preserving your health and promoting longevity? You will love this fast-moving conversation with some memorable sound bites, including how Andrew's training decisions are determined by his moods instead of strategic long-term planning; the difference between association (focusing on the present activity) and disassociation (mind drifting to beer and pizza at the finish line), a little talk about how to manage low carb dietary patterns and vigorous training, and a fresh look at concepts like everything in moderation. Enjoy! Send your questions/comments to info@primalendurance.fit

How can we get a tradeoff between the pursuit of health and longevity and delaying the aging process and getting peak performance?  [00:00:55] 

Andrew describes how his day of activity varies according to his mood which leads to just having fun. [00:04:45] 

If you follow this recommended "according to mood style" training, won't you get out of shape? [00:07:00] 

Endurance athletes are never truly content with their exercise until they are in a state of overtraining. [00:09:22] 

Some people only concentrate on what is going on the body at the time they are training and don't need music or other distraction. [00:09:59]

Participating in a race is constant decision making. [00:11:52] 

Cycling is one of the most dangerous things you can do. [00:16:15] 

Is the Keto scene really the best way to healthy longevity?  [00:19:32] 

What about everything in moderation? [00:26:19] 

Dec 8, 2017

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air.  While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

Alice 42-year-old took a break from competitive racing and returned to traditional race training before she found ketogenic diet and MAF training. She is having problems with MAF training. Why?  [00:02:19] 

Laura asks: Do you think there is a possibility that not everyone has a number that aligns with 180 minus age? [00:07:21] 

Could changing to a fat adapted diet be more sustainably accomplished by making small changes at a time rather than sending stress hormones into overdrive on a 6-weeks crash diet? [00:12:22] 

Ann asks: How does pregnancy fit into MAF training? [00:20:14] 

Zach asks: What about fat adaptation in alpine mountaineering? Considering the altitude, what would be appropriate nutrition? [00:23:16] 

Deva asks about her fluctuating diet from intermittent fasting, some keto diet days, and some medium and high carb days, and a cheat day. [00:30:20] 

Adrian Ballinger

Robert Lustig, M.D.

Nourish, Balance, Thrive

Organifi

Wheat Belly

Dec 1, 2017

Host Mark Sisson welcomes his old friend and strength training expert Jacques DeVore, proprietor of Sirens and Titans Fitness in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, CA. Jacques was featured extensively in the book Primal Endurance for his innovative Maximum Sustained Power (MSP) workout protocol that helps athletes experience performance breakthroughs with time-efficient workouts in the gym that correlate exactly to their competitive goals. Yes, MSP can help both extreme endurance athletes and explosive power athletes. Jacques has worked with Olympic-level sprinters and high jumpers as well as Tour de France level cyclists. He is champion masters cyclist himself! Jacques and Mark get into some good subject matter that will interest fitness enthusiasts of all types.

Mark interviews Jacques Devore about the critical component missing in most endurance athletes. [00:00:16] 

Should an athlete focus primarily on "his or her" particular sport when training? [00:06:25] 

What is the equation for sustainable power? [00:07:41] 

What does it take to retain maximum power? [00:10:48] 

What is an example of the athlete getting up to the next level? [00:15:32] 

Is weight lifting body building? [00:23:31] 

How does diet come into play with these bikers? [00:24:33] 

How does this work with runners and swimmers? [00:25:38] 

Is this something the average person could benefit from? [00:27:28] 

What is the most accurate measure for power? [00:29:27] 

When you look at mobility, you understand what is needed for how your body moves. [00:33:28] 

What is the basic adoption of this principle in the next couple of years? [00:37:41]

All of the subsequent cardio workouts have a much greater value when you follow this principle. [00:40:11] 

Maximum Overload for Cyclists

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