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Primal Endurance Podcast

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.
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Primal Endurance Podcast
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Now displaying: July, 2018
Jul 27, 2018

Brad covers some very thoughtful Q&A, including where weights might fit into the seemingly rigid guidelines and how Primal Endurance differs from Primal Blueprint Fitness guidelines. He looks at the possibility of over-consuming fat and possibly compromising fat loss goals. Brad's super duper awesome cure for plantar fasciitis, how MAF might require you to slow down to a fast walk in the name of rebuilding your broken down body. How to integrate carbs into peak performance efforts and do they cause any trouble? More great stuff along these lines, thanks for the great questions, enjoy the show!

Kevin asks about lifting weights. Please explain the Primal Endurance rules on this activity. Why are you so tough on strength training? [00:01:34] 

Tori wants to know about what can she do after surgery for ACL regarding recovery.  What can she do about her diet since she won't be able to train as she has the past ten years? [00:06:01] 

Olivia has a wonderful testimonial regarding healthy eating. They are eating Keto and paleo and feels great.[00:13:07] 

David Porte. a 50-year-old trail runner, is a steady listener of the podcasts. What can be done about his plantar fasciitis? [00:15:27] 

Conrad asking about short sprints. What would be advised about altering my weekly schedule regarding sprints? [00:19:44] 

Darren has quite a running history. He asks about Maffetone's suggestions of one hour sessions with 15 minute warm up, 30 minutes at maximum aerobic heart rate, and 15 minute cool down. He is training for NYC marathon. What distances should I be training at?  [00:24:35] 

Matt: How do mid-race or pre-race carbs affect my ability to burn fat?  [00:29:23]

Derek is asking: What do you recommend to someone who loves Keto but expends 3000 to 5000 calories a day during constant activity and two highly intense workouts per day? [00:35:50] 

 

IMPORTANT LINKS:

Dr. Mark Cucuzella: He is a professor at West Virginia University School of Medicine. Of his many specialties he has designed programs to promote healthier and better running and has also worked on getting sugar out of the hospital because he knows excessive sugar consumption leads to a host of ailments.

Brad’s podcast with Mark Cucuzzella

Ketogains.com: This podcast is about how physiology affects food habits (and vice versa), carnivore diets, high vs. low-carb/keto for bodybuilding, exogenous ketones, how insulin sensitivity possibly affects BAT vs WAT fat depots.

Ted Mcdonald: Creator of barfoot running.  He has run the Inca Trail in Peru. He teaches yoga.

Paleo FX: The world’s premier holistic wellness event, covering healthy nutrition, fitness, sustainability, self-development, spirituality, relationships, entrepreneurship and everything in between.

Trail Runner Nation: They provide podcasts and social media connections for trail running, pacing, race nutrition, gear and much more.

UCan:  For a steady long-lasting energy without the sugar crash!!

Luis Villasenor:  A Podcast on strength training on a Ketogenic diet

 

QUOTES:

You need to tie in what you are doing nutritionally in training and know exactly what is happening on race day. (Brad)

Jul 20, 2018
Host Brad Kearns shares the little known secret about Janet Jackson's racy lyrics in the song "If" that were imperceptible to the human ear when it was getting radio play in the 90s as a hit song. Horrors Casey Kasem! Brad talks about the overstimulation of the fight or flight response leading first to PRs and then to impending doom. A cool success story from James, who was running 14 min miles when starting MAF 3.5 years ago and now being able to hold the same pace at 52 beats per minute below MAF! How's your training gone over the past 3.5 years? Consider being patient and experiencing a significant reduction in your MAF pace, though not in a linear manner
 
96-year-old golfer WalterKearns.com getting some cameo props for his endurance in life. Jason Trew with a unique and creative way to stay below MAF while running faster spurts and then walking to keep watch from beeping. James Hall asks about the rationale of applying 180-age formula everyone, causing Brad to go off about his burnout experience followed by major medical misfortune in 2015 that he attributes strongly to a chronic training pattern where he routinely exceeded 180-age (by 12 beats in fact) due to using the inferior 75% of max heart rate calculation for an aerobic workout. Oh man, we talk about peeing blood and all kinds of stuff that will have you sorry you ever asked to increase MAF heart rate!! Enjoy this lively show with some memorable takeaway insights.
Jul 13, 2018

Brad catches up with Guinness World Record holding ultra-endurance athlete Tom Seabourne, a professor of Exercise Physiology at Northeast Texas Community College who has pushed the limits of human endurance with numerous finishes in what Outside magazine calls the toughest athletic event in the world: The non-stop solo bicycle Race Across America (RAAM). Tom and Brad reminisce about the old days where Tom was on the cheapest crew in the history of the race, while Brad was part of Johnny G’s most expensive crew in the history of the race. Tom was 103 miles from the finish line at 3,000 miles when he was eliminated on time. Heartbreak, but it got him “addicted” to the event, which he went on to finish several times. Cycling over 300 miles for 22 hours a day is pretty tough, but Tom’s crew follies were epic. Once, his team lost him in the California desert soon after the start. Another time his relay team members bailed in Utah! Tom also set a Guinness World record for the longest stationary bike ride of 185 hours - over 7 days (watching The Office re-runs helped pass the time)! The record performance, notwithstanding the “urine explosion” incident, that you have to hear to believe.

As a “horrible carb addict” during his ultramarathon cycling days, Tom actually developed Type 1.5 diabetes (fasting glucose 450!) despite being at 5% body fat. He also developed atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, which are now becoming commonplace maladies among extreme endurance athletes. Learn what’s happening in the mind of an ultra king during these long efforts, which Tom describes as a flow-like experience. 

 

Brad welcomes Tom Seabourne who is doing amazing athletic exploits while battling various health conditions. [00:00:16] 

What is the Race Across America (RAAM)? What was Tom's experience? [00:01:45] 

How did Tom's plantar fasciitis get cured? [00:08:28] 

What is entailed in being on the crew for this race? [00:09:45] 

Never try something without having the training or having sponsors for it! [00:16:26] 

He had a history of horrible eating. [00:20:53] 

What about calories in and calories out? [00:23:35] 

What happened when Tom did the record-setting ride on the Spinner bike? [00:25:01] 

Tom talks about his atrial fibrillation. [00:31:35] 

Has Tom changed his approach to training since the heart problems? Is he addicted? [00:35:33] 

Does Brad think about going back to the triathlon? [00:39:07] 

Is something special about the sort of meditative experience we have when riding? [00:40:57] 

What is a Type 1.5 diabetic? How is he handling it? What is the difference between Type 1 and 2? [00:53:27] 

What is the ablation procedure for atrial fibrillation? Don't wait too long to take care of yourself. [01:01:08]  

Check out Tom’s book on Amazon called, Glitches Into Gold

  

LINKS:

Glitches Into Gold: https://www.amazon.com/Glitches-into-Gold-Live-Champion/dp/0998833967/ref=sr_1_1?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1530055780&sr=8-1&keywords=glitches+into+gold

Race Across America: http://www.raceacrossamerica.org/

 

QUOTES:

Never try something without having training for it!

We are nothing more than the space between our thoughts.

Jul 6, 2018

Brad lays out a master plan to improve your running performance, looking beyond the obvious and sometimes misguided insights to push harder, add more speed workouts, or run more miles. Endurance athletes often overlook the importance of technique, and often exhibit horrible technique. No excuses are such a simple sport! Golf - plenty of excuses for a lousy swing (it’s very technical and hard to develop), but not running!

Some discussion of technique ensues, emphasizing balanced center of gravity at all times and good posture. The listener is urged to dive deep into the running technique instruction, drills and sprint workout videos in the Primal Endurance Mastery Course at primalendurance.fit. Sprinting is great for technique development because the penalty for a poor technique is severe. Ditto for running barefoot on concrete - you very quickly learn how to strike the ground and absorb shock optimally, and generate explosive force with each stride. In contrast, cushy running shoes ruin your proprioception and enable lousy technique to become ingrained

 

When you sprint, make sure it’s an actual sprint. Even reps of 100-meter sprints are great for the hormonal, musculoskeletal and technique refinement benefits. Brad rarely goes further than this. Sprints are quality over quantity, both in the frequency of workouts (3x/month during intensity phases is plenty) and duration of efforts. Most endurance athletes make their “speed” workouts a suffer fest (ahem, 6 x 800m and so forth). They just get exhausted, don’t really run explosively, and lose out on the benefits of actual sprinting. This show will be a real eye-opener for how to integrate high intensity into your schedule the right way and get you thinking more about good technique instead of just shuffling along. 


QUOTES:

“The penalty for technique errors and not properly absorbing the impact is severe.”

SHOW NOTES:

How does one build aerobic base efficiency? [00:00:58] 

What is the cut-off point 50-50 performance? [00:05:30] 

What are the benefits of doing super hard sprinting? [00:07:19] 

Dorsa flex foot is like imagining pedaling your bike over hot lava. [00:08:40] 

A good way to teach people how to run is to have them run barefoot on cement! [00:10:58] 

How does one rewire the Central Nervous System to be more efficient? [00:13:59] 

How often should a person sprint? [00:16:09] 

What are some good workout suggestions? [00:17:23] 

 

LINKS:

Barefoot Ted

Primal Blueprint

primalendurance.fit.

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