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Primal Endurance Podcast

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.
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May 19, 2017

Escaping the Type-A struggle and suffer approach to training

Host Brad Kearns welcomes favored recurring guest Andrew MacNaughton to present a landmark show about developing the proper mindset and decision-making strategy for endurance training. This podcast might have a important influence on your big picture approach to training and should be listened to repeatedly. Some topics discussed: The advantages of an intuitive, less stressful training schedule over regimented workout programming. How high intensity training indeed delivers quick and impressive results, but comes with increased risk of injury and burnout. Best to integrate high intensity strategically and conservatively, building your base and protecting your health in pursuit of fitness. 

The flawed “struggle and suffer” mentality of the endurance athlete is exposed, with speculation that Type-A endurance performers aren’t truly satisfied unless they are exhausted. To escape from the peer pressure and overly stressful ethos of the endurance community, as yourself important questions about your highest ideals and goals, and align your behavior accordingly. Take Olympic gold and silver medalist Simon Whitfield’s comment to heart, “Today, I’m coached by my 80-year-old self.” Andrew mentions the benefits of training with slower athletes, because it’s “easy to go hard, but hard to go easy.” As discussed on many shows, you can benefit greatly from training at way below MAF heart rate. Andrew used to spin his pedals on the flatlands at 100 bpm (his aerobic max was 155 then). Many hours of this easy effort each week built a phenomenal base from which to launch racing time trial efforts. Don't bother yourself with justifications to increase your MAF heart rate for whatever reason. Slow down, enjoy the journey, and get faster!

 

Andrew MacNaughton is the guest today discussing the coach/athlete relationship and how they can best relate. Brad and Andrew compare and contrast the training styles. [00:01:40] 

Does high intensity training deliver the best results? [00:03:13] 

Is it true that endurance athletes, in general, are uncomfortable unless they are in a state of overtraining? That is what they think feels normal. [00:07:53] 

What are you doing this for and what are you all about? Is this fun for you? [00:10:14] 

How does one balance rest and stress? [00:17:25] 

If you train below your aerobic heart rate, how can that help a performance? [00:23:39] 

Do you need to train your anaerobic muscle fibers? [00:27:34]

Once in a while training is okay. [00:29:26] 

Athletes who aspire to a top level of performance their whole life can learn from this “slowing down” coaching style. [00:29:50] 

Organifi

Simon Whitfield

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