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Primal Endurance Podcast

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.
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Now displaying: June, 2018
Jun 29, 2018

Brad lays out a master plan for you to improve your swimming performance in multisport events. And no, sorry, it’s not about pushing harder and grinding out more yards. It entails a strategic approach where you emphasize the right things and work smarter instead of harder. Let’s consider that there are three components to swimming performance: technique, muscular endurance, and cardiovascular fitness. Technique is by far the most important factor for improvement. The report card of most triathletes might look like: D or F in technique, B or C in muscular endurance and an A+ in Technique is best refined at a slow pace, not when you are fighting to make an interval time. Slow down to go faster - sound familiar? This is when you can best rewire new and improved neuromuscular patterns and make them stick. “Nerves that fire together wire together,” says Dr. Kelly Starrett. Muscular endurance can be developed with dry land exercises that are vastly more time efficient than swimming. Check out the Vasa trainer or Stretch Cordz and hit it hard for 10 minutes; it’s similar in muscular benefit to an hour swim (and remember, you already have an A+ in cardio!) Get out into open water as often as possible, and if you are in the pool, simulate open water by sighting every few strokes or closing your eyes for a few strokes to check your balance. 

Finally, conduct workouts that simulate the race experience, such as time trialing for 1.5k (Olympic) or 2k (70.3) or even 4k (ironman) and immediately jumping on your bike for a time trial. Yes, dripping wet and fussing with wet feet into shoes or water dripping into your lenses. If you are dedicating your season and paying a zillion dollars to enter an Ironman, at least get into the open water for a 4k nonstop swim, then immediately jump on your bike for a long. We don’t want surprises on race day. 

Brad uses paddleboats as a comparison to explain human swimming technique. [00:00:49] 

What can you learn from comparing your stroke to a boat's propeller's action? [00:05:41] 

It is important to find the still water for your stroke. Learn the difference between "Lift Propulsion” and “Drag Propulsion." [00:08:18] 

Technique, muscular endurance, and cardio-vascular fitness are the three main areas of the swim stroke. [00:13:45] 

What is a description of a streamlined position in the water? [00:19:54] 

How do you engrain good technique or revise flawed patterns? [00:23:15] 

You might want to focus on your stroke rate rather than stroke length. [00:30:25] 

How does one improve muscular endurance? [00:32:55] 

How important is it to simulate the competitive experience as I train? [00:40:42] 

 

Dr. Kelly Starrett

Stretch Cordz

Vasa Trainer

BoFlex

Jeff Float

Jun 22, 2018

Host Brad Kearns ups the ante and records this podcast as a Facebook Live event! You can find the video to the show archived on the Primal Endurance Facebook page. Frequent contributor David Lapp weighs in on the do's and don'ts of cold water therapy (use away from the training stimulus). An interesting question is posed about whether high ketone levels might enable magnificent endurance feats at a fast pace (sorry, no can do; the natural laws of the universe apply to fitness, and you will get tired if you aren't prepared to go long...ask Brad when he tried to run 15 miles with Dr. Steven and made it only 7 before tying up). Another interesting question about an adverse telomere length test, and can one improve their longevity profile? Yes, including improving your time in the one-mile run to deliver a strong longevity benefit. Sebastian Bach of Skid Row gets a cameo, trip out on that.

David Lapp has asked if cold therapy is best right after workouts. [00:00:56] 

There shouldn't be a big need to stretch unless you are overtraining!  [00:07:09] 

What about rolling out the IT band? [00:08:23] 

Should one push up to a higher heart rate? [00:10:10] 

Is fat adaptation the reason for my improvement or the MAF way of training? [00:12:35] 

Be cognizant that you may be ingesting food outside the recommended 12-hour window. [00:15:58] 

How does Brad make Kombucha? [00:21:02] 

Charles age 42 asks: "If I'm in ketosis, could I run a marathon and just keep going if I run slow enough?" [00:24:36] 

Paul age 53 says:  "My telomeres tests show that my body is 13 years older than my chronological age! YIKES!!! What can I do?" [00:30:54] 

Aerobics Institute in Texas predicts longevity with a test of a one-mile run. [00:40:57] 

QUOTES:

“There shouldn’t be a need to stretch unless you are overtraining.”

“Keep your caloric ingesting within a 12-hour window.”

 

SHOW NOTES:

Aerobic Institute

Ageless Body, Timeless Mind

The Maybe Not So Definitive Guide to Cold Therapy

Brad Kearns Chest Freezer Cold Plunge

Brad Kearns Morning Green Smoothie

IT Band

Eating Academy

Sami Inkinen

Telomeres

Ben Greenfield

21-Day Primal Reset

 

Jun 15, 2018

Brad fields many interesting and unusual questions in today's podcast.

Question from Charles: What entails maximum sustained power training? How often should a person do this?  [00:01:27]

Brad warns about the danger of road cycling. [00:12:11] 

Brad explains workouts done properly. [00:18:08] 

David Lapp asks: How do you get rid of the bad habit of chronic training patterns?  [00:23:13] 

What is the argument against consistency? [00:29:04] 

Brad gives the secret password for a discount on the Primal Endurance course. [00:34:01] 

Todd asks: If one takes a long walk or a hike at a brisk pace,  is it possible to still trigger the flight or fight response in the body? [00:35:36] 

Travis asks about his frustration of trying to adjust to the MAF training. [00:41:15] 

The cutoff point for 50-50 (50 percent aerobic and 50 percent anaerobic) is a race that lasts 1 minute and 25 seconds.

 

QUOTES:

“A little goes a long way. Make sure you get rest.”

 

“Of all the dangerous things you may do in your life remember that road cycling is the number one most dangerous thing you can do.  Be careful out there!!”

 

“The cutoff point for 50-50 (50 percent aerobic contribution and 50 percent anaerobic contribution) is a race that lasts 1 minute and 25 seconds.”

 

LINKS:

 

Jun 8, 2018

Host Brad Kearns talks to Andre Obradovic from Melbourne, Australia. Andre is a highly engaging personal trainer, triathlon coach, and elite level performer in the 50+ ranks at 70.3 triathlon—ranked 10th in the Ironman All World Athlete rankings for Australia, the most competitive triathlon environment on the planet, mate. Andre’s remarkable story of transitioning from a “little fatty carb burner, sucking up food like a pool sweep machine” back in 2011 to a lean, mean, fat burning beast will inspire you to trust the process and be the best you can be. Basically, Andre cut processed carbs, slowed down his training pace, threw in some mobility/flexibility and power training, and started getting healthier and faster. He went from needing an energy gel to complete a 10k run, to improve his marathon time by 17 minutes despite being 7 years older.  Now he is so committed to the primal approach that he refuses to train a prospective client in his gym until they agree to transition from a SAD diet (Standard Australian Diet - yes they wolf down Weetabix Down Under) to a nutritious, primal-style diet. 

Andre peppers in some highly entertaining and memorable quotes during this show. Trust the process, don’t be a “muppet” (a blind follower of what Andre calls “conventional stupidity”), don’t fritter time away on “Wastebook”, and when you’re running a marathon, focus on a rapid cadence with balanced center of gravity, and try the mantra “Glutes On! Hips Up!”—yes, technique matters even when you’re jogging along at marathon pace. Try training and even racing without a watch to increase focus on form and intuitively optimal effort.  

Andre relates how only two years ago, he was hopeless in the gym. He studied the Maximum Sustained Power concept detailed in Primal Endurance book and Mastery Course and even booked a private Skype session with MSP guru Jacques DeVore to get a custom program designed. Yeah, this dude you line up against in the 50-54 division is going into the gym and hitting the hex bar deadlift with multiple sets at 97 kilos (that’s 213lbs for a guy weighing a buck-forty - amazing!), along with numerous complementary exercises like lat pulls, clap pushups, Bulgarian split lunges (sounds hard), Swiss ball core work, and explosive lunge walks. Yes, friends, this is the picture of the evolved multisport athlete — grabbing podiums spots while training more sensibly and less exhaustively. This is not about flawed and dated “quality vs quantity” debate, but rather about eating right, balancing stress and rest at all times, honoring the MAF heart rate for aerobic development, looking at the big picture of training that includes flexibility/mobility and strength/power as well as endurance, making intuitive decisions (Andre does an extensive warmup in the gym and then has a “check-in” moment before he proceeds with the hard stuff.) Finally, Andre embodies that relaxed, “no worries, mate,” Aussie ethos where you tone down the misplaced competitive intensity and enjoy the journey. Andre reminds us that life is short but we are dead for a bloody long time, so you might as well make your best effort. Enjoy the show. 

 

Andre Obradovic tells us his outstanding accomplishments and has good tips for maintaining health and recovering from stress caused fatigue.  [00:01:20] 

Does he really run marathon at his MAF heart rate? [00:04:25] 

After gaining weight, he was transformed back to normal healthy weight because of the dietary changes he made. [00:06:52] 

Flexibility/mobility training is most important. [00:15:23] 

Should you be focusing on your time and heart rate? [00:20:29] 

Why are we in such a rush? [00:24:40] 

We should be aware how stress affects the family. [00:27:23] 

What does he mean by his "gluts and high hips" mantra when he is running? Why should we run with barefoot? 00:29:19] 

You ought to be able to race without data. [00:32:41] 

How does (MSP) maximum sustained power correlate to endurance competitive goals? What is Andre's workout routine?  00:36:59] 

Checking in on our bodies is so important. [00:43:53] 

MEMORABLE QUOTES

- I go against conventional stupidity!

- Don’t be a Muppet…get off the couch!

- Personal trainers should be talking about diet before the physical training.

- The endurance athlete’s perceived sign of success seems to be training themselves into exhaustion.

- You ought to be able to race without data.

- Think Wastebook instead of Facebook!

- Checking in on our bodies is so important.

 

Andre Obradovic

 

Primal Endurance Mastery Course

Jun 1, 2018

Brad Kearns tackles more interesting Q&A from Primal Endurance podcast listeners and book readers. Submit your questions at www.primalblueprint.com/endurance and they will get covered on the air.  While the questions relate to the specific needs of the individual, the answers are presented in a manner that applies to a broad audience. Listen and enjoy learning about the challenges and successes of your endurance peers, and come away with plenty of practical tips to help improve your training and competitive results.

Dan (?) Can you elaborate on what is a suitable domain for self-experimentation vs. the core principles that have remained unchanged in your routine over the past several years? Can you comment on the relative merit of Fartlek vs. occasional dedicated speed workouts?  [00:00:37] 

David Lapp asks whether one can still do long distance Ironman-length triathlons after age 50 and be healthy? [00:09:26] 

As I am learning to go with the low carb diet, will my fasting lead to not eating enough? [00:20:14] 

Thomas Peterson: Can you please compare and contrast the benefits of doing short speed work during a normal 180 minus age run vs. a dedicated speed workout? [00:29:31] 

Thomas also asks: What are the principles that we should never change come hell or high water? AND What are the aspects of fitness where we should feel free to experiment? [00:30:17] 

Dr. Ted asks "Do I need to add more speed work or race pace runs to help me finish better?" [00:37:16] 

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